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COLLEGE BOUND BROTHERHOOD

 

In 1951, Langston Hughes asked, "What happens to a dream deferred?/ Does it dry up/ like a raisin in the sun?" In 1959, inspired by this concept, Lorraine Hansberry offered imagery of a dried up dream through the eyes of "Walter" played by Sidney Poitier in her profound play, "A Raisin in the Sun". In 1963, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in his "I Have A Dream" speech accused the United States of America of deferring dreams by "giving the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." Over fifty years later, Meek Mill proclaims that "Dreams Are Worth More Than Money." The consistent thread in this inter-generational conversation is Black men reflecting on dreams, the value of those dreams, and how to realize those dreams in the face of obstacles.

The College Bound Brotherhood is a movement of nonprofits, school districts, postsecondary institutions, young men, their families and community committed to making sure that the dreams of our young Black men are never deferred. 

A core tactic of the Brotherhood is to use data at every step and phase of this work to lift up what works in place and better understand what doesn’t. Also, the progress to date has hinged on the preexisting and evolving relationships between the non-profit partners and the school districts. These relationships enabled the establishment of data sharing agreements, collective analysis, and collective action among MFEI, and our non-profit and school district partners. 

Our central theory of change is to engage in systems change strategies with districts by providing technical assistance and other supports to non-profits so they are equipped to serve community as systems thinkers and strategists versus solely as direct service providers at district high school sites. The same is true with partnerships with secondary institutions -they too deploy resources and key relationships that are based on the systems change strategies catalyzed by the Brotherhood collective. In short, the Brotherhood has become a data-informed, interdependent, cross-sector system of accountability focused on the college success of Black young men.

 

 

COLLEGE BOUND Brotherhood ACCOMPLISHMENTS

283 Black young men from the graduating high school classes of 2013, 2014 and 2015 with college persistence rates at 99% and institutional retention rates at 80%. 

Collective impact work organized around 5 school districts with community based organizations as systems influencers, including Antioch, Hayward, Oakland, San Frnacisco, and West Contra Costa School Districts. 

The creation of a tri-level data tracking system that includes student, school site, and system-wide data, with district profiles and key performance indicators 

Executed data sharing agreements with non-profit partners and school districts 

Race and gender focused LCAP/LCFF3 planning

District-wide universal FAFSA/Dream Act completion 

$800K scholarships awarded and $1.2M in public aid received 2013-2015

Post-secondary partnerships with Chabot College Striving Black Brothers /Hayward Promise, CSU East Bay, San Francisco State University,  and Los Medanos Community College

 

 
Thus far, the Brotherhood scholarship awardees persist in college overall at a rate of 98%. More impressively, at four-year institutions, they have a 100% persistence rate. Year-to-year persistence rates are defined by the National Student Clearinghouse as the percentage of students who return to college at any institution the following academic year.

Thus far, the Brotherhood scholarship awardees persist in college overall at a rate of 98%. More impressively, at four-year institutions, they have a 100% persistence rate.

Year-to-year persistence rates are defined by the National Student Clearinghouse as the percentage of students who return to college at any institution the following academic year.

 
 

For more information about the College Bound Brotherhood please contact Deen Hasaan at dhasaan@marcusfoster.org